June 15, 2013

June 15

I am enjoying the ravens. One came to the tree right above me. S/he was talking a blue streak, making all kinds of wonderful sounds (many of which I had never heard before). Very loud. Very bold. Among the rulers of this Far Northern place. Very few birds stay here all winter; ravens do.

The raven (or a raven) who was making those raven clicking or clacking sounds yesterday is doing it again. He’s also doing cheek-popping sounds consisting of two notes. He’s in a nearby tree, and I can’t see him, but his clacking carries (probably pretty far). Is he calling his mate? The group?

A group of ravens is called a congress.

From another source: A flock of ravens is called a conspiracy, constable, or an unkindness of ravens.

Ruth Rendell, the novelist, gave them this latter name. (Why? To compete with a murder of crows?)

Ravens can produce at least 30 distinctive sounds. They are among the most intelligent of birds.

One raven lived for 29 years in captivity. A flock of about 800 ravens was seen outside Fairbanks (when?).

~~see more at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/common_raven.pdf

_________________________________________________________________

The Common Raven (Corvus corax), also known as the Northern Raven, is a large, all-black passerine bird. Found across the northern hemisphere, it is the most widely distributed of all corvids. There are at least eight subspecies with little variation in appearance—although recent research has demonstrated significant genetic differences among populations from various regions. It is one of the two largest corvids, alongside the Thick-billed Raven, and is possibly the heaviest passerine bird; at maturity, the Common Raven averages 63 centimetres (25 inches) in length and 1.2 kilograms (2.6 pounds) in mass.

Common Ravens can live up to 21 years in the wild, a lifespan exceeded among passerines by only a few Australasian species such as the Satin Bowerbird and probably the lyrebirds.

Young birds may travel in flocks but later mate for life, with each mated pair defending a territory.

~~Wikipedia

A raven just flew through the sky above me, making a sound all the way across. It’s a sound I don’t recall ever hearing from a raven. I am witness to all kinds of unfamiliar raven sounds up here in Alaska. I got interested in ravens when I was in Yellowknife a few years ago. And, in Anchorage and Palmer, before that. They are very interesting.

_____________________________________________________________

I am watching myself and others my age getting old.

I am practicing self-control. Real power is in self-control; fake power is in controlling others.

It’s 9:30 pm and I’m just sitting out here (me and the mosquitos) in the light of the Midnight Sun.

I worked with Chip a little in the garden yesterday. I took out rocks. No worms can live here; they all die out in the winter.

I bought a little jade ring (for a wedding band look) in Tok ($4.25).

Mom and Dad John’s wedding anniversary. What would it be? About the 72nd?

______________________________________________________________

I realize that the airport runway is way over there (not 20′ from Chip’s yard as I have been writing). The gravel road by Chip’s yard is for cars/trucks. The actual runway is about 100′ away, parallel to this gravel road. Another gravel road is on the other side of the airstrip.

The air taxi service from here goes to more places than I mentioned before (hunting trips, business, personal): it also goes to mining camps, gets/delivers the mail, and does “village supply,” which sounds very intriguing indeed. Far off, isolated places and people with bad teeth? I don’t know.

According to the gals at Beaver Fever, what people do here in winter is just go from home to car to work to car and back home. Nothing else. They may start their cars up once or twice during the long, cold winter nights (all cars are plugged in to electricity). That’s it.

Bugs in Alaska? Ants? Yes, I have seen them. Other insects are in short supply, it seems.

Biologists Study Alaska Bugs’ “Antifreeze”

May 8, 2003

In interior Alaska, the winter temperatures average slightly below 0°F (-18°C). Frequently they dip to 20° below zero F (-29°C), and can dive to 60° below zero F (-51°C). Yet insects not only survive but thrive there. How?

In Anchorage, Todd Sformo, a graduate student in biology and environmental physiology at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, retrieves one answer after another as he digs through a thin layer of spring snow to layers of dead leaves below.

There he unearths dozens of small green stink bugs—shield-shaped, half-inch-long creatures. Under a warming blanket of leaf litter, they have waited out winter in a state of reduced metabolism, or diapause, as researchers call it.

A secret of the insects’ overwintering strategy lies in the blood, known as hemolymph.

Last month Sformo and other researchers came to Alaska to harvest that blood and purify the protein within it that allows the insect to “supercool” by lowering its freezing temperature.

The protein operates by a process known as thermal hysteresis, first identified in Antarctic fish—lowering the freezing point of water in the hemolymph. Insects, however, may practice hysteresis even more effectively.

(there’s more to this article)

________________________________________________________________

Watching “Hounds of the Baskervilles,” a Sherlock Holmes episode (BBC) reminded me of what happened when Seth and Noelle showed up in Hanalei, Kauai last year and completely surprised me. I couldn’t believe what my eyes were telling me because my brain “knew” something else (that they were in Florida, as they had told me).

This is a very interesting phenomena to observe in oneself. Supposed logic (i.e., what I supposedly knew, from facts, to be true) was defied by one’s own senses. It turned out that the facts were what was untrue, and I had based my belief (that they were in Florida) on false logic (they are in Florida, hence, they cannot be here). Seth and Noelle had told me they were in Florida to make it a real surprise, and it was. So much so that I literally had to pause for a few minutes; I was unable to respond naturally until I figured out where the problem was in my logic.

______________________________________________________________________________

I am left-brained. Like Sherlock Holmes (I am his slave, not his equal), I create an artistic, imaginative, romantic life out of my basically logical, organized, detail-oriented brain. Sherlock wanted to be a pirate, and he is a sort of pirate; I wanted to be a cowgirl, and I am a sort of cowgirl.

The Right Brain

According to the left-brain, right-brain dominance theory, the right side of the brain is best at expressive and creative tasks. Some of the abilities that are popularly associated with the right side of the brain include:

  • Recognizing faces
  • Expressing emotions
  • Music
  • Reading emotions
  • Color
  • Images
  • Intuition
  • Creativity

The Left Brain

The left-side of the brain is considered to be adept at tasks that involve logic, language and analytical thinking. The left-brain is often described as being better at:

  • Language
  • Logic
  • Critical thinking
  • Numbers
  • Reasoning

___________________________________________________________________________________

My post-suicide (attempt) healing consisted of several strategies:

~~Got B.A. in Psychology

~~got lots of counseling

~~yoga and meditation

~~positive affirmations

~~reading (Buddhism, nature, etc.)

~~time in nature (primarily, camping)

~~and more…

_____________________________________________________________________________

I am constantly exploring “alternate realities.” I have been calling this mysticism. It’s mostly around ingesting marijuana, and, when stoned, I tend to dwell on the Search For the One Love, the Eternal Soulmate. I would like to move on to perfecting myself. I can only do this when I know my Soulmate has found me (because I can’t find him).

The raven (or a raven) who was making those raven clicking or clacking sounds yesterday is doing it again. He’s also doing cheek-popping sounds consisting of two notes. He’s in a nearby tree, and I can’t see him, but his clacking carries (probably pretty far). Is he calling his mate? The group?

A group of ravens is called a congress.

From another source: A flock of ravens is called a conspiracy, constable, or an unkindness of ravens.

Ruth Rendell, the novelist, gave them this latter name. (Why? To compete with a murder of crows?)

Ravens can produce at least 30 distinctive sounds. They are among the most intelligent of birds.

~~see more at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/common_raven.pdf

_________________________________________________________________

The Common Raven (Corvus corax), also known as the Northern Raven, is a large, all-black passerine bird. Found across the northern hemisphere, it is the most widely distributed of all corvids. There are at least eight subspecies with little variation in appearance—although recent research has demonstrated significant genetic differences among populations from various regions. It is one of the two largest corvids, alongside the Thick-billed Raven, and is possibly the heaviest passerine bird; at maturity, the Common Raven averages 63 centimetres (25 inches) in length and 1.2 kilograms (2.6 pounds) in mass.

Common Ravens can live up to 21 years in the wild, a lifespan exceeded among passerines by only a few Australasian species such as the Satin Bowerbird and probably the lyrebirds.

Young birds may travel in flocks but later mate for life, with each mated pair defending a territory.

~~Wikipedia

_____________________________________________________________________________

A raven just flew through the sky above me, making a sound all the way across. It’s a sound I don’t recall ever hearing from a raven. I am witness to all kinds of unfamiliar raven sounds up here in Alaska. I got interested in ravens when I was in Yellowknife a few years ago. And, in Anchorage and Palmer, before that. They are very interesting.

Mimicking Dervla Murphy, I had (her travel favorite) sardines today for lunch. Ack! Awful. I used to like them, but not any more. They are dull and don’t taste as good as tuna (or any other fish). I’m sure fresh (not canned) sardines are wonderful.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s